Window-Eyes: Performance, Reliability, and Stability
"Unleashing the power of your mind's eye."
©1995-2006 GW Micro, Inc. All Rights Reserved
E-Mail: wesupport@aisquared.com
Phone: 260-489-3671
Released: 11/27/2006

[Please note: The following information can also be found in the Window-Eyes Readme option, under the Help menu in the Window-Eyes Voice Control Panel.]

Welcome to Window-Eyes 6.0

Congratulations!

You are about to experience the cutting edge leader in screen access technology: Window-Eyes 6.0.

With more people switching to Window-Eyes, it is important to recognize that we have a lot of beginner users. To show our commitment to new customers, we have engineered Window-Eyes to be easier to use for new users. Intermediate users will appreciate the flexibility they’re familiar with by using existing enhanced features. Advanced users will be able to harness the power of new application support. Window-Eyes covers all areas of computer expertise and experience levels.

Keeping In Touch

Now that you have the power of Window-Eyes at your fingertips, why not join up with other Window-Eyes users on the GW-Info e-mail list? To subscribe, visit http://www.gwmicro.com/support/email_lists/, enter your email address in the email edit box, and select the Subscribe GW-Info button. Alternatively, you can send an e-mail message to listserv@gwmicro.com. Leave the subject blank, and type "join gw-info, your email address" in the body (without the quotes, but note that the comma is required). For example, "join gw-info, myemail@abc.com"

Regardless of the method you choose, you will receive a confirmation. Reply to that confirmation (with no modification) and you will become a member of the largest public network of Window-Eyes users, always eager and willing to answer any questions you may have. Although we encourage all users to help each other with questions and problems, you can take comfort in knowing that the GW-Info list is constantly monitored by GW Micro employees.

You may also contact us directly by using the contact information listed above.

Thank You!

Window-Eyes is developed with you in mind. Please feel free to contact us regarding any questions, comments, or suggestions that you may have; we are anxious to hear from you. Now read on to learn more about your latest investment, and thank you for choosing Window-Eyes!

Installation

When installing Window-Eyes 6.0 (as well as any future upgrade), you will be asked if you want to make a backup of your existing set files. If you choose yes, the Window-Eyes installation will default the Path edit box to a location of x:webackup (where x: is the drive letter where Window-Eyes is currently installed). You may, however, enter a path in the Path edit box manually, or select a different location using the Directories tree view provided. Note that you should not choose your Window-Eyes directory as a location for backing up your set files, as that directory will be removed if Window-Eyes is ever uninstalled. If you choose no to the backup prompt, no backup of your existing set files will be created.

New Features in Window-Eyes 6.0

The following section provides detailed information about the new features of Window-Eyes 6.0. Please read through this documentation carefully so that you can use the new features of Window-Eyes successfully.

PowerPoint

Microsoft PowerPoint is a presentation software package, which provides visual information through the use of slide shows to enhance oral presentations such as training sessions, classroom lectures, and business seminars. PowerPoint slides contain combinations of text, images, and multimedia effects, and are often displayed by connecting a computer to a projection system so the presentation can be visible to a large number of people. PowerPoint presentations can also be distributed electronically, and accessed much like other Microsoft Office documents. Window-Eyes supports PowerPoint 2000 and up.

The Microsoft PowerPoint DOM (Document Object Model)

Window-Eyes uses the Microsoft PowerPoint DOM (Document Object Model) to communicate directly with PowerPoint (much like the Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel DOM support in Window-Eyes), insuring a robust, 100%-text-accurate-100%-of-the-time environment when navigating through PowerPoint presentations.

PowerPoint Navigation

When you initially launch PowerPoint, you will commonly be presented with four different panes: the Slide pane, Task pane, Notes pane, and Thumbnails pane. The Slide pane is where you can edit the contents of a given slide. Pressing the TAB key will move you between the slide objects, and announce the object type (such as "title place holder"), the text content (if any content exists), and object details (such as size, placement, etc. – object details are controlled by verbosity options which are discussed below). You can press ENTER to edit the selected object. After you’re done editing an object, you can press ESCAPE to exit the edit mode, and re-select the object. The contents of the Task pane will differ depending on the situation, and may contain one of several topics, including Getting Started, Help, Search Results, Clip Art, Research, Clipboard, New Presentation, Template Help, Shared Workspace, Document Updates, Slide Layout, Slide Design, Slide Design-color schemes, Slide Design-Animation Schemes, Custom Animation, and Slide Transition. The Notes pane allows you to enter notes regarding the selected slide (notes are not visible to the audience during a slide show presentation). The Thumbnails pane can be used to navigate through the individual slides of a presentation. The F6 key is used to rotor between all open panes.

PowerPoint Presentation Playback/Slide Show

PowerPoint presentations are displayed using a feature called Slide Show, wherein the slides are displayed full screen with no other portion of the Windows desktop visible. In Slide Show mode, Window-Eyes will present each slide in the Browse Mode buffer. Basic navigation keys such as arrow keys, page up/down, home, etc, etc. can be used to navigate the information in the slide. You can also press the letter I to move to the next list item, and H to access any slide notes. Pressing the space bar will cause the presentation to move forward one slide. Pressing backspace will cause the presentation to move backward one slide. When a new slide is displayed, Window-Eyes will refresh the Browse mode buffer with the new slide information. Window-Eyes can also announce diagrams (and sub objects of diagrams) and animations within a slide. If a slide contains animated content, Window-Eyes will announce the number of effects when the slide loads, and additionally indicate the effect at the beginning of the line containing the animation by announcing, “E X on/off/other,” where E stands for Effect, X is the number of the effect on the slide, and on/off/other indicates the behavior of the animation (on means that the effect will add information to the slide, off means the effect will remove information from the slide, and other means the effect will animate without adding or removing information from the slide). Pressing the space bar will run the animations in the order they are listed on the slide without affecting Browse mode. Window-Eyes gives you the power to review slide animations before they happen, giving you total control over your presentation, and providing you with accurate information, especially in cases where animations do not run top to bottom.

PowerPoint Verbosity

Window-Eyes provides two categories of PowerPoint verbosity options: Playback (for controlling the verbosity of a Slide Show), and Slide Pane (for controlling the verbosity while editing slide contents).

* Playback
- Start At Previous Position – Default: Checked – This option will allow you to return to the previous position of a previously viewed slide during the same presentation rather than beginning at the top of the previously viewed slide. This feature is similar to the previous position feature found in Browse Mode.
- Include Slide Notes – Default: Checked – This option will cause any notes associated with the selected slide to appear at the bottom of the Browse Mode buffer during the Slide Show. An indication of notes is added to the slide announcement with the phrase, “has notes.” For example, “slide 2, 4 effects, has notes.” The notes are separated from the slide content with the text “Slide Notes,” and can be accessed quickly using the Browse Mode Heading key (H by default).
- Do Not Indicate Effects, Indicate Effects Summary Only, Indicate Effects Summary and Details (default) – This option indicates the level of effect summary used during a Slide Show. Indicate Effects Summary Only will indicate the number of effects for the selected slide. Indicate Effects Summary and Details includes the number of effects for the selected slide, and effect details for each animation for the selected slide. Do Not Indicate Effects means no indication of existing animations.

* Slide Pane
- Indicate Object Size – Default: Checked – This option indicates the width and height of the selected object using user specified units.
- Indicate Overlapping Objects – Default: Checked – This option indicates if an object overlaps another slide pane object, and if so, what object is being overlapped by announcing, “Overlaps X” where X is the object being overlapped.
- Indicate Object Placement – Default: Checked – This option indicates the position of an object in relation to the top and left sides of the slide using user specified units.
- Indicate Text Overflow Within Object – Default: Checked – This option indicates if the selected object contains more text than will fit in the dimensions of the object. If the text overflows the object’s dimensions, Window-Eyes will indicate the details of the overflow by announcing, for example, “Overflows top margin by 2 lines and bottom margin by 3 lines.” If the text overflows to the left or to the right, Window-Eyes will indicate the amount using user specified units.
- Indicate Object Overflow Within Slide – Default: Checked – This option indicates if the selected object is positioned off the top, bottom, left, or right side of the slide.
- Inches (default), Centimeters, Millimeters, Points – This option indicates the measurement used when announcing object units.

PowerPoint Hot Keys

Page Navigation – The Page Navigation dialog (INS-TAB by default) provides the ability to quickly navigate through or review the components for the selected area. You can select hyperlinks, objects, comments, or slides for the entire presentation, or hyperlinks, objects, and comments for a selected slide. Selecting the Focus Item button will automatically focus a selected item (hyperlink, object, comment, or slide), making navigation through presentations quick and easy.

Tables – All of the table hot keys that exist for Microsoft Word function the same in Microsoft PowerPoint, including Cell Right, Cell Left, Cell Up, Cell Down, To First Cell of Row, To Last Cell of Row, To First Cell of Column, To Last Cell of Column, To Top Left Cell, To Bottom Right Cell, Row, From Row Start, Row To End, First Row Cell, Column, From Column Start, Column To End, First Column Cell, and current Cell. The table hot keys will only work while you are editing a cell’s contents in the slide pane within a true table.

Element Properties – If no object is selected in the Slide pane when you press INS-E, you will receive all information about the slide. When an object is selected, the information presented in the Element Properties dialog will be relative to the selected object.

Outlook Calendar

Window-Eyes boasts a revolutionary new way to access the Calendar feature of Microsoft Outlook. Rather than attempting to retrofit the existing, inaccessible Outlook Calendar interface, Window-Eyes provides all appointments and dates in a concise and simple to use Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog.

The Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar supports both local and remote calendars (such as those used with Exchange servers), and can be accessed from anywhere (assuming that Outlook is running), regardless of what application is active when the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar hot key (INS-C by default) is pressed. Note: In previous versions of Window-Eyes, INS-C was defined as the AutoDetect Cursor hot key. AutoDetect Cursor has been redefined as CTRL-INS-C. The Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar will stay open until you close it. This way, you can ALT-TAB between the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog and other open applications.

Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar supports Microsoft Outlook 2000 and greater. We recommend Outlook 2003 for the best in Outlook Calendar accessibility.

The Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog consists of the following controls:

* Appointments - List View: This list view contains day (i.e. Monday), date (i.e. 7/11/2006), Start Time (i.e. 12:00pm), Subject (i.e. Lunch with Bill), and location. The Appointments list view is populated based on the selected Timespan (see below).

* Details - Read Only Edit Box: This read only edit box contains all of the available information about the appointment selected in the Appointments list view. If no appointment is selected, the details read only edit box will be disabled.

* Timespan - Group Box: The Timespan group box contains the following controls:
- Day - Radio Button: The day radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments for the selected day. By default, day starts with today’s date.
- Work Week - Radio Button: The work week radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments for the selected work week. Work Week includes the days defined in the Outlook Calendar options, as well as which day the work week begins. By default, work week contains Monday through Friday, and begins with the Monday prior to today’s date.
- Week - Radio Button: The week radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments for the selected week. Week includes all seven days of the week. By default, week starts with the Sunday prior to today’s date (or with the beginning week day you selected in Outlook options).
- Month - Radio Button: The month radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments for the selected month.
- Year - Radio Button: The year radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments for the selected year.
- Custom - Radio Button: The custom radio button populates the Appointments list view with all appointments between the user defined start and end dates, specified in the Start Date and End Date edit boxes.

* Custom Range - Group Box: The Custom Range group box contains the following controls if the Custom timespan is selected:
- Start - Edit Box: The Start Date edit box allows you to enter the beginning date for the custom date range. If you enter a start date without specifying an end date, then only the date entered in the start date edit box will be displayed. You can enter the date in just about any format you want using numbers.
- End - Edit Box: The End Date edit box allows you to enter the ending date for the custom date range.

* Display - Group Box: The Display group box contains the following controls:
- Show Appointments - Check Box: The Show Appointments check box causes all appointments for the selected timespan to be displayed in the Appointments list view
- Show Available Times - Check Box: The Show Available Times check box causes available time periods (specified in the Outlook Calendar options) for the selected timespan to be displayed in the Appointments list view.
- Compact - Check Box: The Compact check box causes all items pertaining to a specific day in the Appointments list view to be collapsed into a single entry. For example, with the Week timespan selected, pressing the Compact check box will cause all of the appointments for the week to be collapsed into single days. Un-checking the compact check box causes all of the Appointments to be expanded into individual entries in the Appointments list view. When the compact check box is checked, the Appointments list view headers will change to Day, Date, and Appointments, where Appointments is the number of appointments in the selected day. If you select the Open button while in compact mode, the timespan will switch to Day view, and the Appointments list view will include all appointments for the selected day.

* Previous - Button: The Previous button causes the Appointments list view to populate with the previous unit of the selected timespan. For example, with week selected, pressing the Previous button will cause the Appointments list view to populate with the appointments for the week prior to the current week. Pressing the Previous button again will cause the list view to populate with the appointments for two weeks prior to the current week.

* Current - Button: The Current button causes the Appointments list view to populate with the current unit of the selected timespan. For example, if Day is the selected timespan, and you navigated several days prior to the current day using the Previous button, pressing the Current button would cause the Appointments list view to populate with the appointments for today.

* Next - Button: The Next button causes the Appointments list view to populate with the next unit of the selected timespan. For example, with week selected, pressing the Next button will cause the Appointments list view to populate with the appointments for the week after the current week. Pressing the Next button again will cause the list view to populate with the appointments for two weeks after the current week.

* New - Button: The New button causes Outlook to open a New Appointment dialog for the day selected in the Appointments list view. If the Day timespan is selected, pressing the New button will cause the New Appointment dialog to open for the selected day. If any timespan other than Day is selected, and an appointment is selected in the Appointments list view, pressing the New button will cause the New Appointment dialog to open for the selected day, with the start time set to 8:00am. If any timespan other than Day is selected, and no appointment is selected in the Appointments list view, pressing the New button will cause the New Appointment dialog to open for the current day, with the start time set to the specified Outlook day start time (by default, 8:00am). In addition to the date information, if a unit of available time is selected in the Appointment list view, pressing the New button will cause the New Appointment dialog to set the start time to the corresponding available time.

* Open - Button: The Open button causes Outlook to open the Appointment dialog for the appointment selected in the Appointments list view.

* Delete - Button: The Delete button causes Outlook to delete the selected appointment in the Appointments list view. You may also press the DELETE key to cause Outlook to delete the selected appointment. A confirmation dialog will be presented in both cases.

* Close - Button: The Close button closes the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog. You can also close the dialog using the standard methods of pressing ESCAPE, or ALT-F4.

The Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog works similar to the Window-Eyes Word Page Navigation dialog in terms of loading a large amount of data. If five seconds have passed after you open the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog, Window-Eyes will announce, “Building element list. Please wait.” At this point, you can either continue to wait for the data to populate the appointments list view, or you can press any key to abort the loading, and leave the appointments list view empty.

If you open a recurring appointment using the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog, you will be asked if you would like to open the entire series. If you say yes, you will be able to edit the properties to affect all associated appointments. If you say no, you will be able to edit the properties to affect only the selected appointment. If you delete a recurring appointment using the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog, you will be asked if you would like to delete the entire series. If you say yes, you will delete all appointments in the series. If you say no, you will delete only the selected appointment. This feature is only available in Outlook 2003 and up.

If you close Outlook with the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog open, the dialog will close automatically. When the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog closes, all settings used in the dialog will be retained and used the next time the dialog is opened, even if Window-Eyes has been shut down, and reopened.

The Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar supports multiple calendars. You can choose which calendars to use in the Calendar section of Microsoft Outlook. For example, to access the list of available calendars in Microsoft Outlook 2003, do the following:

1. Press CTRL-2 to open the Microsoft Outlook calendar view.
2. Press F6 to focus the list of available calendars.
3. Press the Up or Down arrow to maneuver through the list of available calendars.
4. Press the Space bar to check or uncheck the selected calendar.

When new calendars are selected, the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog will automatically refresh to include the new information.

Outlook/Outlook Express Email

Window-Eyes offers easy and intuitive access to Microsoft Outlook and Microsoft Outlook Express email information. Access to status information, From, Date, To, CC, BCC, Subject, and Attachment fields can be read and accessed using several new hot keys:

        ALT-1: From
        ALT-2: Date/Sent
        ALT-3: To
        ALT-4: CC
        ALT-5: BCC
        ALT-6: Subject
        ALT-7: Attachments
        ALT-8: Status

The first press of any of the previous keys will cause the information to be read. If the field does not exist, Window-Eyes will announce the field type followed by, “Not found.” You can press any of the previous keys a second time to move focus to the appropriate field so that you can interact with the control (assuming that control allows focus the Status bar, for example, does not).

For example, pressing ALT-7 will read the names of any attachments that exist in a message. Pressing ALT-7 a second time will focus the attachment control so that you can arrow through the list, able to interact with the attachment of your choice. Once you hear an attachment name, you can press SHIFT-F10 to bring up a context menu of options for the selected attachment (such as opening and saving depending on the attachment file type).

Navigating Email Headers

Both Outlook and Outlook Express will often reformat text in the To, From, CC, and BCC fields once focus has moved away from the control, or once auto-complete engages, making it difficult to review email addresses. In other words, while you can enter wesupport@aisquared.com in the to edit box, and arrow between each letter individually, once you tab away and then back, you are no longer able to get the cursor between the individual characters. Instead, the cursor will only be placed either at the beginning of the text object, or the end when pressing the left and right arrow keys. When using the arrow keys to move through text objects in these fields, Window-Eyes will automatically read all the text in the object next to the cursor. Window-Eyes also gives you the power to read these text objects by pressing the Word hot key (CTRL-NUMPAD-RIGHT ARROW). Pressing the Word hot key twice will spell the text. Pressing the Word hot key a third time will spell the text phonetically. You can use the Character hot key in the same manner as the Word hot key.

Accessing Attachments

Thanks to the Window-Eyes Attachment hot key, accessing the attachments list in Outlook and Outlook Express is quick and easy. Once you have focus in the attachment list (by pressing ALT-7 twice), you can select an attachment and press ENTER to open it, or you can press SHIFT-F10 to bring up a context menu of additional options (including opening, printing, and saving).

Internet Explorer 7

Internet Explorer 7 brings, among other things, the popular feature of tabbed browsing to Microsoft’s web browser. Tabbed browsing enables you to open multiple web pages in a single browser window rather than using multiple windows. Window-Eyes fully supports tabbed browsing in Internet Explorer 7 much like it does in Mozilla Firefox.

The following hot keys allow you to manipulate web page tabs in Internet Explorer 7:

CTRL-ENTER: Opens the selected link in a new tab in the background.
CTRL-SHIFT-ENTER: Opens the selected link in a new tab in the foreground.
CTRL-T: Opens a new, blank tab in the foreground.
CTRL-TAB: Rotor forward through open tabs.
CTRL-SHIFT-TAB: Rotor backward through open tabs.
CTRL-W: Close the current tab.
CTRL-# (where # is a number between 1 and 8): Switch to a specific tab number.
CTRL-9: Switch to the last tab
CTRL-ALT-F4: Close all other tabs
CTRL-Q: Toggle Quick Tabs view
CTRL-SHIFT-Q: Display Tabs List menu
CTRL-E: Access the Search edit box

You can also access the actual tab control by focusing the search edit box, and then pressing TAB until you read the web page tabs. Once the tabs are focused, you can use the left and right arrow keys to move between the available tabs.

Internet Explorer 7 has a new command bar that offers the most widely used features for more direct access. Buttons on the command bar have associated hot keys as follows:

ALT-M: Opens the Home context menu
ALT-R: Opens the Print context menu
ALT-J: Opens the RSS context menu
ALT-O: Opens the Tools context menu
ALT-L: Opens the Help context menu

Window-Eyes will automatically speak any security alerts that Internet Explorer 7 provides, such as phishing, IDN, and SSL alerts. You can use the Window-Eyes Speak Summary hot key (CTRL-SHIFT-S by default) or the Window-Eyes Status line hot key (CTRL-INS-S by default) to reread current security warnings.

Internet Explorer 7 also provides the ability to review RSS feeds for a given page. RSS feeds are a popular method for web sites to distribute news headings, articles, and/or multimedia content (such as podcasts). When RSS feeds are available, you can access the RSS feed menu with ALT-J. You can then select a feed, and press ENTER. A new page will load with the links to the various offerings available from the RSS feed.

Thanks to a close partnership between GW Micro and Microsoft, Browse Mode performance has been increased across the board in all supported versions of Internet Explorer. In addition, Microsoft has boosted Internet Explorer 7 performance substantially, and Window-Eyes happily takes advantage of this speed increase.

Microsoft Office 2007

Window-Eyes provides full support for Microsoft Office 2007. The power and stability that Window-Eyes introduced to previous versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint can be found in the same Office 2007 applications.

Although much of the functionality of the Office applications has been retained between versions, Office 2007 introduces one major change, advertised by Microsoft as “the most significant update to the Microsoft Office user interface in more than a decade”: the Microsoft Office Ribbon. The following three sections include text taken from The Microsoft Office User Interface website describing the functionality of the Microsoft Office Ribbon.

The Ribbon

The traditional menus and toolbars have been replaced by the Ribbon—a new device that presents commands organized into a set of tabs. The tabs on the Ribbon display the commands that are most relevant for each of the task areas in Office Word 2007, Office PowerPoint 2007, or Office Excel 2007. For example, Office Word 2007 has tabs for writing, inserting, page layout, working with references, doing mailings, and reviewing documents. Office Excel 2007 has a similar set of tabs that make sense for spreadsheet work: creating worksheets, inserting objects like charts and graphics, page layout, working with formulas, managing data, and reviewing. These tabs simplify accessing application features because they organize the commands in a way that corresponds directly to the tasks people perform in these applications.

Contextual tabs

Certain sets of commands are only relevant when objects of a particular type are being edited. For example, the commands for editing a chart are not relevant until a chart appears in a spreadsheet and the user is focusing on modifying it. In current versions of Microsoft Office applications, these commands can be difficult to find. In Office Excel 2007, clicking on a chart causes a contextual tab to appear with commands used for chart editing. Contextual tabs only appear when they are needed and make it much easier to find and use the commands needed for the operation at hand.

Galleries

Galleries are at the heart of the redesigned applications. Galleries provide users with a set of clear results to choose from when working on their document, spreadsheet, or presentation. By presenting a simple set of potential results, rather than a complex dialog box with numerous options, Galleries simplify the process of producing professional looking work. The traditional dialog box interfaces are still available for those wishing a greater degree of control over the result of the operation.

Window-Eyes and the Microsoft Office 2007 Ribbon

Whether you’re moving through the Ribbon tabs, commands, command groups, or command options, Window-Eyes will consistently and reliably tell you where you are, and what short cut keys are available.

Take, for example, the Microsoft Word 2007 Ribbon. Pressing the ALT key causes the Ribbon tabs to gain focus. You can then arrow left and right through the tab options (such as Home, Insert, Page Layout, References, and so on). Once you have a tab selected, you can press TAB to access the commands for the selected tab. Once in the command list, you can TAB and SHIFT-TAB to move between the commands. Commands are contained in horizontal containers (called command groups) that span the width of the Ribbon, each group dealing with a specific function such as font, paragraph, styles, etc. When you move between command groups, either by tabbing from the last command in one group to the first command in the next group, or by using the SHIFT-LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to move between groups, Window-Eyes will indicate that you’ve moved into a new group.

For example, moving from the Proofing command group to the Comments command group under the Review tab would cause Window-Eyes to say, “Comments Group. New Comment. ALT, R, C. Button.” Window-Eyes tells you the command group you’re in (in this case the Comments group, which contains commands that deal specifically with comments), the name of the selected command (New comment, which, if selected, would create a new comment where the cursor is located in the document), the shortcut keys to access the command quickly (in this case, ALT, R, C, which, when pressed from the document, would insert a comment where the cursor is located), and the type of control (in this case a button).

Window-Eyes also supports Ribbon galleries. Galleries are complex controls similar to menu items, but which can contain multiple kinds of controls, like list boxes with multiple groups of items combined with menu items. Take, for example, the shapes command located in the Illustrations command group under the Insert tab. The shapes gallery includes a list box of several groups of shape items. Window-Eyes not only announces each group as they’re accessed, but also reads the index of the selected item in the selected group. The shapes gallery also contains a menu item located after the shape list box, which Window-Eyes reads easily after navigating from the shapes list box.

Window-Eyes Key Describer

For beginner users, knowing where keys are on the keyboard, and what keys perform what commands, is essential to successful computing. The Window-Eyes Key Describer offers beginner users the comfort of examining keyboard keys without worrying about performing erroneous commands, or typing unwanted characters.

The Window-Eyes Key Describer hot key is INS-1 by default, and when pressed the first time will say, “Key describer on.” From this point on until the Key Describer is disengaged, Window-Eyes will speak the keys that are pressed.

For example, if you press the letter A, Window-Eyes will say, “A.” If a hot key is pressed, Window-Eyes will speak the function of that hot key. For example, if you press CTRL-BACKSLASH, Window-Eyes will say, “Menu. Activates the window-eyes voice control panel.” If a key label has been assigned to a key stroke, Window-Eyes will read the key label as well. For example, if you engaged the Key Describer in Microsoft Word, and then press CTRL-HOME, Window-Eyes would say, “Top of document.” In Internet Explorer or Firefox, Window-Eyes would say, “Top” while in the Key Describer. You can change a key label to speak whatever you want, and the Window-Eyes Key Describer will reflect that change. For example, you could change the key label for the hot key CTRL-HOME in Microsoft Word to be “My favorite key label.” When that key is pressed with the Key Describer engaged in Microsoft Word, Window-Eyes would say, “My favorite key label.”

If a Braille key is pressed, the Braille key name will be spoken, and its function (if one exists). The text will also be displayed in quick message mode for Braille users. If you press the Window-Eyes Key Describer hot key again, Window-Eyes will say, “Key describer off,” and normal keyboard functionality will resume.

The Key Describer will automatically disengage if focus changes (such as when you press ALT-TAB to focus another window, or press the Windows key to focus the start menu). Window-Eyes gives beginners and advanced users alike the power to learn available keystrokes in different applications with the Window-Eyes Key Describer.

Tip of the Day

Window-Eyes is packed with features, and learning the ins and outs of all of them can take quite a bit of time. The Window-Eyes Tip of the Day feature alleviates the overwhelming fear of having to memorize the entire manual by providing small snippets of information about various Window-Eyes features every time Window-Eyes is launched.

The Tip of the Day dialog contains a read only edit box of tip information, a Previous button to move to the previous tip, a Next button to move to the next tip, a check box labeled Show Tips at Startup (used to control the showing of the Tip of the Day when Window-Eyes launches), and a Close button. Several tips also provide a View Help Topic button, which when selected, will open the Window-Eyes manual directly to the section that corresponds with the tip information. If a tip has a web site associated with it, a View Web Site button will be available. When the View Web Site button is selected, the associated page will load in your default web browser.

If you elect to hide the Tip of the Day dialog when Window-Eyes launches, you can always choose to view the Tip of the Day dialog using the Tip of the Day menu item in the Window-Eyes Help menu.

Each time the Tip of the Day dialog is displayed, a new tip will appear, much like using the Next button moves to the next tip. Window-Eyes will remember the last tip displayed so that you don’t always start on the same tip every time Window-Eyes launches.

Application Help

The Window-Eyes Application Help feature introduces the idea of creating personal notes for specific controls, dialogs, and applications and combines it with factory written, generic control information, helping to create a comprehensive environment for keeping track of, and learning how to use an application.

The Window-Eyes Application Help hot key (CTRL-SHIFT-QUESTION by default) opens a dialog containing the following controls:

Information: Edit Box – The title of this edit box, as well as the contents, will change depending on the radio buttons discussed below. The information presented in this edit box is completely user editable, and can contain notes on how to use specific features of an application.

Control: Radio Button – When selected, this option will cause the information edit box to be labeled “Control Information” and the contents of the Control Information edit box will be relevant to the control that was focused when the Application Help hot key was pressed.

Dialog: Radio Button – When selected, this option will cause the information edit box to be labeled “Dialog Information” and the contents of the Control Information edit box will be relevant to the dialog that was active when the Application Help hot key was pressed.

Application: Radio Button – When selected, this option will cause the information edit box to be labeled “Application Information” and the contents of the Application Information edit box will be relevant to the application that was active when the Application Help hot key was pressed.

Generic Control Information: Read-only Edit Box – This edit box contains information describing the control that was focused when the Application Help hot key was pressed. Generic control information includes detailed control descriptions, as well as Window-Eyes specific information on reading and interacting with controls.

Save: Button – This button, when selected, will save any information entered into the Information edit box.

Close: Button – This button, when selected, will close the Application Help dialog.

Take, for example, everyone’s favorite text editor: Notepad. If you bring up the Application Help dialog in Notepad, and select the Application radio button, you can enter details to the Application Information edit box that deal with using Notepad as a text editor. You might choose to keep track on hot keys used often in the editor, such as ALT-O, W to toggle Word Wrap, or CTRL-H for find and replace. These notes apply to the application as a whole, and would therefore be stored with the Application radio button selected. If you opened the Print dialog in Notepad, you might choose to make notes regarding what kind of paper setup you prefer for printing text document, or how to collate more than one copy. These notes apply to the print dialog alone, and would therefore be stored with the Dialog radio button selected. Once in the list of printers in the print dialog, you might then want to make notes regarding which printers are connected to your machine locally, and which are remote, or which are inkjet, and which are laser printers. These notes apply to the list view of printers located specifically in the print dialog of Notepad, and would therefore be stored with the Control radio button selected.

Once you’ve entered custom information regarding the control, dialog, or application, you can select the Save button to save all the information you entered.

If control information exists for the focused control when you open the Application Help dialog, the control radio button will be selected automatically. If no control information exists, but dialog information does exist for the dialog that is active when you open the Application Help dialog, then the dialog radio button will be selected automatically. If no control information or dialog information exists, but application information does exist for the window that is active when you open the Application help dialog, the application radio button will be selected automatically. If no information exists for any of the three categories, the application radio button will be selected by default. You can easily review information contained in all three categories by selecting the appropriate radio button.

Window-Eyes Set File Manager

The Window-Eyes Set File manager offers a comprehensive method of installing, uninstalling, and keeping track of Window-Eyes Set files.

Selecting the Set File Manager option from the File menu in the Window-Eyes voice control panel will cause a dialog to open, containing the following controls:

Applications – List View: The applications list view will present all available set files, along with their installed status, as well as version information. The list view contains four columns used to represent this information -- Name, Status, Factory Version, and Installed Version. The Name column lists the names of the Set File packages that are available for use. Status will be one of the following:

1. Not Installed – Indicates that the selected set files have not been installed.
2. Installed – Indicates that the selected set files have been installed.
3. Modified – Indicates that the selected set files have been installed, and have been modified from the original, factory version.
4. Out Dated – Indicates that the selected set files have been installed, but are older than the available, factory version.
5. Newer – Indicates that the selected set files have been installed, and are newer than the available, factory version.

The Factory Version column indicates version numbers for the set file packages that are included with Window-Eyes.

The Installed Version column indicates version numbers for the set file packages that are currently installed for the active Window-Eyes user. If the Installed Version column contains
"n/a", then Window-Eyes is unable to determine the version number for the installed set files. This can happen when upgrading from an older version of Window-Eyes. A new install of Window-Eyes, however, will always have correct version numbers listed. Also, if you choose to reload any factory set file packages, the version number will show up after the set file package installation.

The Applications list view allows you to select multiple set file packages for batch installing or uninstalling. In other words, rather than selecting and installing several set file packages individually, you can choose to install multiple set file packages at one time.

Information – Read-only Edit Box: The Information read-only edit box contains the readme included for the selected factory set file. Set file readmes include information on using the set files successfully with the associated application. The title of this read-only edit box will change when a new set file package is selected to reflect the name of the associated application. For example, if the Adobe Reader set file package is selected in the Applications list view, the title of the Information edit box will change to say, “Information for Adobe Reader.” If more than one set file is selected, the Information read-only edit box will be disabled.

Set Files – Read-only Edit Box: The Set Files read-only edit box lists all files contained in the set file package selected in the Applications list view, along with each individual file’s installed status. If a set file or dictionary file has been installed, the word Installed will appear after the file name. If a set file or dictionary file does not exist, the word Missing will appear after the file name. If the set file or dictionary file differs from the factory version, the word Modified will appear after the file name. The title of this read-only edit box will change when a new set file package is selected to reflect the name of the associated application. For example, if the Adobe Reader set file package is selected in the Applications list view, the title of the Information edit box will change to say, “Set Files for Adobe Reader.” If more than one set file is selected, the Set Files read-only edit box will be disabled.

Install – Button: When selected, this button will cause Window-Eyes to install the set file package (or packages) selected in the Applications list view.

If you are installing set files that already exist, you will be prompted to confirm set file replacement. When a dictionary file already exists, you will be prompted with an additional choice to replace your existing dictionary, to leave your existing dictionary, or to merge the contents of your existing dictionary with the contents of the factory dictionary. In other words, if you have modified your exceptions dictionary, for example, and you choose to install newer Window-Eyes default set files, you have the option of retaining your existing exception dictionary entries, while still installing the latest exception dictionary file. The dialog that prompts to you Replace, Leave, or Merge contains three checkboxes:

* Apply to all dictionaries – This option will cause the selected action (Replace, Leave, or Merge) to apply to all dictionaries, regardless of type, or application.

* Apply to all X dictionaries (where X is a type of dictionary, such as graphic, exception, character, key label, or color) – This option will cause the selected action (Replace, Leave, or Merge) to apply only to the indicated type of dictionary.

* Apply to all Y dictionaries (where Y is the name of an application, such as Adobe Reader, or Internet Explorer) – This option will cause the selected action (Replace, Leave, or Merge) to apply only to the dictionaries of the indicated application.

These Replace, Leave, or Merge check box options can come in handy when installing multiple set file packages at one time.

Uninstall – Button: When selected, this button will cause Window-Eyes to uninstall the set file package (or packages) selected in the Applications list view.

Update Outdated – Button: When selected, this button will cause Window-Eyes to determine which installed set files are out of date, and automatically update them to the latest factory version.

Keyboard Features

Window-Eyes includes several new keyboard features, including five new hot keys:

1. Toggle All Voices (global) – Undefined by default – This hot key will toggle all Window-Eyes speech off globally, regardless of the active application when the key is pressed. Speech will stay off until the hot key is pressed again, or when Window-Eyes is re-launched. This feature allows Braille users to disable speech with a single Braille hot key.
2. Shutdown Window-Eyes – CTRL-INS-F4 by default – This hot key will prompt you to close Window-Eyes, just like pressing CTRL-BACKSLASH/ALT-F4, but with a single key stroke.
3. Battery Level – INS-Q by default – This hot key will query the status of the current battery level on computers using battery power. The information read is dependent on what information the battery hardware provides, and may be different from machine to machine. If no battery information is available, Window-Eyes will say, “No battery.”
4. Key Describer – INS-1 by default – This hot key will engage the Window-Eyes Key Describer.
5. Outlook Calendar – INS-C – This hot key will open the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog assuming that Microsoft Outlook is running. If Microsoft Outlook is not running when the Outlook Calendar hot key is pressed, Window-Eyes will say, “Microsoft outlook must be running to use the Outlook calendar.” To free up the INS-C hot key for the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog, the Autodetect Cursor hot key has been redefined to CTRL-INS-C.

Additionally, two popular Window-Eyes keys have been redefined:

* Autodetect Cursor – CTRL-INS-C – Formerly INS-C. To free up the INS-C hot key for the Window-Eyes Outlook Calendar dialog, the Autodetect Cursor hot key has been redefined to CTRL-INS-C.

* Application Help – CTRL-SHIFT-QUESTION – Formerly CTRL-SHIFT-F1. To minimize conflicts with help features of other applications, and to provide a more intuitive key stroke, the Application Help hot key has been redefined to CTRL-SHIFT-QUESTION.

Window-Eyes supports the ability to define number pad hot keys based on the status of the numlock setting. For example, with the numlock on, the star key would be captured as NumOn-Star. With the numlock off, the star key would be captured as NumOff-Star. The same goes for slash, star, dash, plus, and ENTER. With numlock on, you can use the keys in conjunction with all the other numpad number keys, which can be useful for use applications such as the Windows calculator. If you want to define one of these keys to function the same, regardless of the numlock settings, define the key using the current numlock status, and then toggle the numlock status, and define the key again. Using this feature with the star example above, the key would then be called Numpad-star, indicating the key would function the same regardless of whether the numlock is on or off.

The Word Mode option has been removed from the Keyboard menu, and integrated into the Keyboard Voice menu item. Previously, the Keyboard Voice option could be either on or off. Now, the Keyboard Voice option can be one of the following options: Off, On with Characters, On with Words, On with Words and Numbers, On with Characters and Words, or On with Characters, Words, and Numbers.

* With this option set to Off, the keyboard voice will silence the speaking of keys as you type.

* With this option set to On with Characters, individual keystrokes are voiced as they are typed.

* With this option set to On with Words, individual letters you type are held in a queue until you press the SPACE BAR, ENTER key, any digit or a punctuation-mark key. Then, the whole word is voiced.

* With this option set to On with Words and Numbers, individual letters and digits you type are held in a queue until you press the SPACE BAR, ENTER key, or a punctuation-mark key.

* With this option set to On with Characters and Words, individual keystrokes are voiced as they are typed, and whole words are spoken when you press the SPACE BAR, ENTER key, any digit or a punctuation-mark key.

* With this option set to On with Characters, Words, and Numbers, individual keystrokes and digits are voiced as they are typed, and whole words are spoken when you press the SPACE BAR, ENTER key, or a punctuation-mark key.

One advantage to integrating the word mode option into the Keyboard Voice menu item is that now the word mode settings are automatically set globally when the Keyboard Voice option is set globally.

The Word Mode Rotor hotkey has also been changed to Keyboard Voice Rotor in the Miscellaneous hot key dialog. Also, if you have any of the Keyboard Voice options containing word mode enabled, we automatically silence the space.

The Mouse Pointer Identification option has been removed from the Mouse menu, and integrated into the Mouse Voice menu item. Previously, the Mouse Voice option could be either on or off. Now, the Mouse Voice option can be one of the following options: Off, On with Pointer Identification Off, On with Pointer Identification Delayed, On with Pointer Identification Delayed (Dictionary Only), On with Pointer Identification Immediate, or On with Pointer Identification Immediate (Dictionary Only).

* With this option set to Off, the mouse voice will silence the speaking of the physical mouse movements and will not announce pointer changes.

* With this option set to On with Pointer Identification Off, physical mouse movements will be spoken, and pointer changes will not be announced.

* With this option set to On with Pointer Identification Delayed, physical mouse movements will be spoken, and only pointer changes that last more than one-half second will be announced.

* With this option set to On with Pointer Identification Delayed (Dictionary Only), physical mouse movements will be spoken, and only pointers that have been defined and saved in the appropriate location and that last more than one-half second will be announced.

* With this option set to On with Pointer Identification Immediate, physical mouse movements will be spoken, and all pointer changes (regardless of how long they last) will be announced.

* With this option set to On with Pointer Identification Immediate (Dictionary Only), physical mouse movements will be spoken, and only pointers that have been defined and saved in the appropriate location will be announced (regardless of how long they last).

One advantage to integrating the pointer identification option into the Mouse Voice menu item is that now the pointer identification settings are automatically set globally when the Mouse Voice option is set globally.

The Keyboard Layout option in the Keyboard menu of the Window-Eyes Voice Control panel (available when the Menu Level option is set to something other than Beginner) will indicate the last layout selected. In other words, if you choose the Default layout, and accept the “Continue to update your keyboard layout?” prompt, the Default layout menu item will become checked. If you then switch to the Laptop layout, the Laptop layout menu item will become checked. The storage mechanism for all keyboard layout options has been updated, meaning that additional keyboard layouts may be available in the future (most likely from the GW Micro web site) without requiring a new version of Window-Eyes. If you are upgrading, this option will not be set until you select a keyboard layout (although selecting a layout is not required if all your keys are functioning as you like).

Included in the Keyboard Layout menu is the JAWS keyboard layout. The primary purpose of having a JAWS keyboard layout for Window-Eyes is to offer individuals who use JAWS, an easy way to use Window-Eyes without having to learn all new hot keys. In addition, trainers that are already familiar with JFW will have an easier time teaching others to use Window-Eyes. They will be able to concentrate on the computer, Windows and applications and spend less time on the screen reader. The JAWS keyboard layout does not change the functionality of Window-Eyes, but rather allows JAWS users to experience the power and stability that Window-Eyes offers using familiar keystrokes.

Miscellaneous Features

Mouse Pointers are now available in Windows 2000 and up. The default names are as follows:

arrow
cross
I beam
icon
size
size northeast southwest
size north south
size northwest southeast
size west east
up arrow
hourglass
app starting
no
size all
help

If Window-Eyes encounters a pointer it can't identify, it says Pointer XXX undefined. Mouse pointers can be labeled with the Capture Pointer hot key (CTRL-SHIFT-P by default).

The Sound Card combo box option in the Select Synthesizer dialog now uses the Windows system names to indicate what sound devices are available for use with the DECtalk Access 32, or ViaVoice synthesizers. For example, instead of saying Sound Card 1, you might hear, “SB Live! Audio [B000]”

The Window-Eyes API has been marked “Safe for Scripting” meaning web applications that take advantage of the Window-Eyes COM interface can now do so without receiving a security warning from Internet Explorer.

The following set file packages have been updated in Window-Eyes 6.0:
* Eudora
* IE
* Office 2000, XP, 2003, and 2007
* Outlook Express
* Window-Eyes Defaults
* Windows Explorer
* Windows Help

Window-Eyes fully supports long file names. The Window-Eyes file open and file save dialogs have been updated to reflect long file name usage for set files, and all dictionary files.

Window-Eyes support for the latest version of Skype has been enhanced to include full support for menus, the contact list, Contacts/Dial/Live/History tab controls, and more.

The Window-Eyes Number feature now supports a "synthesizer" option (in addition to On and Off) in the Screen menu (or with the Numbers hot key). The Synthesizer setting tells Window-Eyes to pass on numbers without any modification, giving the the synthesizer full control over number pronunciation.

Braille Features

Window-Eyes Braille support continues to mature thanks to constant feedback and testing by dedicated Braille users, and raises the bar for Braille display support by providing several new Braille features.

Several Braille features can now be set locally (per application), including:
* All options in the Braille Scrolling Options dialog
* All options in the Braille Options dialog
* Braille graphics, verbosity, and graphic symbols
* Hotkeys can also be global and/or set file specific (described below)

All other items remain global You can use the TEXT2SET and SET2TEXT utilities to apply Braille settings to multiple applications at once. Read section F.4: SET2TEXT and TEXT2SET Utilities in the Window-Eyes Manual for additional information.

Braille hot keys have the ability to be application specific, or global. The Window-Eyes Braille hot key dialog contains two radio buttons that let you switch between the application specific and global settings.

* All Applications – When selected, this radio button will cause Window-Eyes to allow defined hot keys to work in all applications.
* Current Application Only – When selected, this radio button will cause Window-Eyes to treat hot keys as application specific, meaning that hot keys will work in the application where they are defined.

You can define hot keys for either or both groups in the Braille hot keys dialog. When you accept the OK button, all settings will be saved automatically.

The Application hot keys override global hot keys when using a Braille display key. Application specific hot keys are stored in a unique section of a .WBC file. WBC files are much like WE files, only they deal with Braille information vs. speech. The WBC file will be named after the executable file used to launch the application (for example, Notepad.wbc contains Window-Eyes Braille information used with the Notepad text editor). Each Braille display will have a unique section in the WBC file, meaning that application specific hot keys will be Braille display specific. Global hot keys are also Braille display specific, and are still stored in the Braille.ini file.

The Braille hot key list has been enhanced to show all hot keys alphabetically. In addition, the hot key list contains the first action defined for the hot key. If multiple actions exist for a hot key, the first action will be displayed, followed by the phrase, “multiple actions.” For example, the Braille Sense hot key advance 1 now says, “advance 1 – Up Arrow” in the list of hot keys. Advance 3 advance 4 now says, “advance 3 advance 4 – Shift-Tab – (multiple actions).”

Braille can now be toggled on and off, much like how Voice, Hot Keys, and Cursor Keys can all be toggled on and off using the Braille option in the General menu of the Window-Eyes voice control panel. Toggling Braille off can be a useful feature when dealing with applications that self-Braille (similar to turning off speech in applications that are self-voicing).

When toggling the Voice off, using the General menu, Braille will continue to function as if the voice were still on (even though no synthesized speech is available), ensuring full Braille functionality, even when voice has been disabled.

The Braille Scrolling Options dialog contains a new option called “Indicate Line Change.” Previously, the beep to indicate a line change was always enabled; now you can turn the beep off. With this option enabled, if you pan left or right and consequently navigate to a new line, a beep will sound.

Auto Route Cursor moves the application cursor (rather than the mouse pointer) to new lines automatically, allowing for continuous reading of documents. In other words, as you scroll, the cursor will move with you. Relying on the application cursor means that you have the ability to navigate through an entire document and not just the text that’s on the screen (as is the case when tracking with the mouse pointer). The Previous and Next line hot keys, as well as scrolling to the right, will place the cursor at the beginning of a new line. Scrolling to the left will place the cursor at the end of a new line. Applications with no cursor, or disabling this feature, will cause the mouse pointer to be tracked. The Auto Route Cursor option can be access from the Scrolling Options dialog in the Braille menu of the Window-Eyes voice control panel, or can be assigned to a Braille hot key.

Window-Eyes raises dots 7 and 8 to indicate the location of an application’s cursor. Dots 7 and 8 will blink when indicating the mouse pointer. If both the application cursor and the mouse pointer exist at the same location (after routing the mouse to the cursor, for example), Window-Eyes will keep dot 7 raised, and blink dot 8. Although still a user definable setting, this hybrid raised/blinking set of dots provides you with clear feedback when the mouse and the cursor reside in the same position.

Window-Eyes now supports the Braille Pronto Braille display, the Hedo MultiLine Braille display, and continues to support more Braille displays than any other screen reader.

German grade 2 Braille is now supported.

The method used to store Braille display information has been revamped, allowing for new displays to be added in the future without affecting existing Braille settings. This revamping, however, does require a new Braille.ini file to be installed, meaning any hot keys that differ from the factory defaults will be lost during the installation. Future upgrades, however, will provide additional Braille display functionality without affecting custom settings. This update will happen automatically with the upgrade install.

A new option has been added to the Braille Menu called Apply Braille Settings. This option will take all current Braille settings (i.e. those active settings shown in the Braille menu) that are set file specific, and apply them to all installed set files. Beginners can use this feature to retain all Braille settings in all applications. Advanced users can detail which options to use globally, and which to use for specific applications. You can customize Braille settings even more by first applying all the settings you want globally, and then making individual set file changes. If you make any additional Braille settings, and wish to apply them globally, you will need to activate this option again.

Enhancements between Window-Eyes 5.5 and Window-Eyes 6.0

The following section provides detailed information about the enhancements between Window-Eyes 5.5 and Window-Eyes 6.0.

Set File Enhancements:

To take advantage of any new set file feature listed below, you must install the factory default sets using the Set File Manager dialog in the File menu of the Window-Eyes control panel. You should reload all factory set files for any application that you use, regardless of whether or not they are listed below.

* Window-Eyes Defaults
- Window-Eyes uses a more robust method of determining executable names when creating .WE files for associating set files with applications to avoid conflicts with applications that used common DLLs. Now, Window-Eyes appends the module name before each section name if the module and exe names are different. In other words, instead of [reclass on create] for example it would be [module name:reclass on create] where module name is the actual module name.
- The global graphic dictionary has been updated with checked, unchecked, and checked disabled graphics for Outpost, and Windows XP network connection check boxes.
- CTRL-Z (Undo) has been added to the global key label dictionary.
- Initial application help has been added to for the majority of all Window-Eyes dialogs. More will be added before the final Window-Eyes 6.0 release.
- Command prompt set file has auto route turned off, show extra spacing enabled, and set pixels per space to 8.

* Kurzweil 1000 have been updated.

* Winamp sets have been updated.

* Eudora
- Added the spell check set file for Eudora 7.

* Office 2000, Office XP, Office 2003 have all been updated.
- Includes email hot keys for reading headers and attachments.

* Office 2007 sets have been added.

* Removed Easy CD Creator 4 and 5 as the set files were incomplete.

Braille Enhancements:

We resolved a problem where Window-Eyes would stop speaking after reading a user window twice in a row with Braille enabled.

We fixed a problem in Microsoft Word where strange characters were showing up at the end of lines in Braille.

If you had a Braille hotkey setup in the Braille hot key dialog, and then pressed the Clear Key button, it wouldn’t clear the actions. This problem has been resolved.

After updating to Tieman/Optalec Voyager drivers version 3.0, Window-Eyes started seeing each keypress twice. This problem has been resolved.

All Handy Tech Braille displays now require the new Handy Tech driver to be installed. Without their driver installed the display will not function. If you use a HandyTech Braille display, you will need to download the latest HandyTech drivers from http://gwmicro.com/Support/Downloads/?fileNo=1109. Your HandyTech Braille display will not function with Window-Eyes 6.0 until the updated drivers have been installed.

We fixed a problem where Braille would list the path to the root of a tree view twice.

Some Braille toggle hot keys were labeled inconsistently. This problem has been resolved.

Browse Mode enhancements:

We resolved a problem where Google would take several minutes to load in Internet Explorer.

We fixed a problem where Browse mode would turn on, even after turning it off, and setting AutoLoad to be off.

We resolved a problem where moving by paragraph in both Internet Explorer and Firefox was skipping large portions of text.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would get stuck while trying to load web pages in Firefox.

We resolved a problem where a certain combination of Braille and Verbosity settings would cause problems when reading headers.

After performing an unsuccessful Window-Eyes find in Browse mode, Window-Eyes would announce, “not found,” and then reload Browse Mode. This has been resolved.

We have added support to Window-Eyes for Firefox 2.0a1 and beyond.

We resolved a problem where Read to End in Browse Mode would not start on the current line if you were not at the top of a document. Now, when Window-Eyes does an automatic read to end in Browse mode, it reads the current line first rather than starting on the line after the current line. The only time it doesn't start on the current line is if the current line is "top"

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would get stuck in a loop of announcing, “Browse Mode Not Available.”
We fixed a problem where Browse Mode would not refresh on a new message when deleting an old message in Outlook Express.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would not load Browse Mode in the latest version of the Talking Communities conference/chat client.

Browse Mode would load continuously when using the arrow keys or tabbing through a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat Reader. This problem has been resolved.

Office Enhancements:

We have resolved two problems regarding the Window-Eyes Office add-in. First, it was possible the Enhanced Support for Current Word Document option in the global menu would be disabled even though you truly were in Word. Second, it was possible for Window-Eyes to get confused on what had focus, causing us to think we were not in the document window, and consequently not load the Window-Eyes Office add-in.

Window-Eyes would read entire lines of text when characters were entered into the new appointment dialog in the Outlook Calendar. This problem has been resolved. Cursoring keys are also allowed to now be used in this control.

We fixed a problem where not all attributes were being reported correctly by the ANSI/attribute hot key.

We resolved a problem where Window-Eyes would announce attribute changes in Word as black on transparent.

The time fields in the Outlook Calendar new appointment dialog were not reading correctly when using the up and down arrows. This problem has been resolved.

We fixed a problem where Read to End could hang in Microsoft Word XP tables.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would announce document information each time a key was pressed in Microsoft Word XP.

We resolved a problem where the verbosity dialog wouldn’t always open to the correct group when opening it in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint.

We can now tell the difference between combo edit and standard combo boxes in all versions of Outlook.
Window-Eyes now reads email auto complete addresses for all versions of Outlook as you select between multiple items.
We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes was not reading the correct name as you arrowed through the Select Names dialog in the Outlook contact manager.

Pressing the TAB key in the Outlook 2000, Select Names dialog would read the wrong item. This problem has been resolved.

Miscellaneous Enhancements:

We have cleaned up some memory leak issues.

We have resolved several problems submitted by the Window-Eyes error reporting utility.

We have improved stability and performance significantly.

We resolved a problem where Window-Eyes was not detecting the correct module name of an application when it was started with runas to run the program as a different user.

We changed the verbosity phrase "menu activated" to "menu opened."

The TEXT2SET and SET2TEXT applications are now full, 32-bit applications.

We have enhanced the feature of speaking field names. Now, when Window-Eyes detects that a control is in a group box, that group box name will be spoken in addition to the control’s associated field name.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would turn off the Clear Type Windows text effect.

We fixed a problem where speech would disappear when exiting a Terminal Services session.

If Window-Eyes was running on a terminal server, and a screen saver was also running, Window-Eyes would be shut down when the screen saved was cleared. This problem has been resolved.

We resolved a crash that would happen when connecting with Windows XP Remote Desktop.

Shift Left Mouse click and Control Left Mouse Click were not working. This has been resolved.

We resolved a hook error on launch of Window-Eyes when using Messenger Plus Live.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes was unable to determine certain executable names of an application when Window-Eyes launched.

Window-Eyes now ignores invisible status lines, such as the status lines for hidden tabs in Internet Explorer 7.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would not use the correct voice when changing voice settings in the Window-Eyes control panel.
We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes was not reading help, search results correctly in Visual Studio 2005.

Specific speech parameters for SAPI5 engines were not being saved. This problem has been resolved.

INS-NUMPAD-DOWN ARROW would not work correctly as a Read to End hot key. Actually, any time the INS key was used as a modifier for Read to End, you wouldn't be able to abort; You had to alt-tab to stop it. This problem has been resolved.

The keyboard layouts have been updated to set the hotkeys to NumOff (meaning only with numlock off) instead of Numpad (meaning with numlock on or off) for the slash, star, dash, and plus.

We fixed a problem in the default keyboard layout where the Read Status hot key (CTRL-INS-S) was not defined.

We have moved the “Identify MSAA Controls” verbosity from the Browse Mode verbosity group to the Focus verbosity group.

We fixed a problem where links in email were not being identified until one was activated. This allows you to enable the Outlook Express security setting “Block images and other external content in HTML e-mail,” and still be able to access links. Note that this setting is enabled by default under Windows XP SP2.

We fixed a problem where TITLE attributes would be ignored when a blank ALT attribute existed for an image in Browse mode in Firefox.

Replying to a message in Outlook Express would sometimes cause Window-Eyes to say "browse mode not available". This problem has been resolved.

We fixed a problem where combo boxes were not working in either Windows Defender or CPRS. We also resolved a problem where list boxes were not speaking in CPRS.

When using the System Tray hot key (INS-S), and then right clicking, a context menu would pop up, but many items would not read. Also, Window-Eyes would say, “system” instead of the menu option. This problem has been resolved.

Performance and Stability Enhancements:

Thanks to the Window-Eyes Error Reporting feature, we fixed a GPF that existed when navigating tree views.

We fixed a problem where Window-Eyes would lock up when coming out of stand-by or hibernation.

We fixed a random GPF involving Braille.

We fixed a GPF that would happen when closing Window-Eyes after associating a set file containing hyperactive windows.

Thanks to the Window-Eyes Error Reporting feature, we were able to fixe a GPF that would occur when shutting down Window-Eyes.

We fixed some stability problems reported in some synthesizer drivers.

We fixed a stability problem in the Brailliant/Vario/Pronto Braille displays.

We fixed a major problem with applications that could use an alternative desktop.

We fixed several other errors submitted through the Window-Eyes Error Reporting feature.